CASL, the Canadian anti-spam act, contains provisions that take effect on January 15, 2015 that are intended to prevent malware from being installed on computers (including any device that uses software such as smartphones, cars, TV’s, routers, thermostats…).  The sections require the software provider to obtain express consent from the computer user for certain installations.  There are 2 different levels of consent. Both require the disclosure of specified information, and the second level requires the consent to be obtained outside of the license.

Unfortunately the CASL software consent provisions are tortuous and unclear, and if taken literally could cause huge problems for the software industry. The IT bar has been collectively scratching its heads trying to understand how to interpret the sections. The CRTC has tried to interpret them in a way that aligns with the intent of stopping people from installing malware on computers.  While the CRTC interpretation may not line up with the act, we basically have to work within it for the time being.  When advising clients we will have to include caveats that we can’t guarantee that a court would agree with the CRTC’s interpretation.

Because January 15 is close at hand, software providers with customers in Canada should consider whether they need to do anything to comply.  Violating the act has the same huge potential consequences as violating the anti-spam provisions.

The chart below is an attempt to give an overview of the analysis that a software provider should do to determine what, if anything, they need to do.  There are 2 caveats to this chart.  First, the sections are technical and have their own caveats and exceptions, so you can’t rely on the chart alone.  Second, it relies on the CRTC position as it stands at this moment based on statutory language that really doesn’t make a lot of sense.

download pdf CASL software chart

CASL software chart